Attendance in Student Success

High attendance for students is connected to higher academic achievement, more positive social-emotional outcomes, and decreased risk for dropping out. Simply put, schools can only educate and support students to their fullest potential when students are present each day, ready to learn. With Student Success, you can view an attendance indicator based on average daily attendance. 

Attendance at the School and District Level

“On Track for College/Career Readiness” students attend 95% of school days or more, “On Track for Graduation” students attend between 90% and 95% of school days, “At Risk” students attend between 80% and 90% of school days, and “Critical” students attend less than 80% of school days in given time period. 

As many states and school districts place a renewed emphasis on chronic absenteeism, most commonly defined as missing more than 10% of school days in a year, Student Success designates chronically absent students as “At Risk” and “Critical.” Using Panorama Student Success allows educators to dig deeper to view each student’s absences on a day-by-day or course-by-course basis. 

While schools may calculate attendance in different ways—for instance, taking attendance during first period or at multiple points throughout the day (e.g., once per class period)—Student Success aggregates this information to calculate an overall average attendance rate for each student.

Attendance on a Student Profile

Once you've selected a student to support, you can see many more details about their attendance on their individual profile page. In addition to the total percentage of days present, you'll be able to view how many times a student has missed a specific course, as well as the number of tardies, course absences, or full day absences in a calendar view. When you hover over these squares, you may see additional context about what happened on that day, such as "Excused Absence" or "Field Trip" or "Doctor's Note."

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